Crafting war for 12 years

World of Warcraft (WOW) is celebrating its 12-year anniversary this month and there’s no better way to celebrate than by building chibi-versions of the game’s most iconic characters with LEGO. Mike Dung built a downright cute Illidan Stormrage and an even more adorable Lich King.

Chibi Illidan Stormrage

These little guys are chock-full of amazingly accurate details, from the Lich King’s iconic helmet to Illidan’s rockin’ bod. I also love the simple, yet effect way Mike build these guy’s weapons (Arthas’ Frostmourne and Illidan’s warglaives). I think I better log in now and run a few daily quests.

Chibi Lich King

Money may not buy happiness, but I’d rather cry in a Ferrari than on a bus

Everything I know about expensive sports cars can fit into a single Duplo treasure chest (with a bit of room to spare). But I can appreciate the beauty of these two Ferraris, especially since they have been transformed into stunning LEGO mosaics by Ryan Link.

The mosaic above features the Enzo Ferrari and is 60 studs wide and 27 bricks tall, while the mosaic below is the Ferrari 625 TRC which is 50 studs wide and 16 bricks tall. Ryan used a “studs not on top” (SNOT) building technique with both horizontal and vertical plates to achieve these high-resolution mosaics. The end result is so beautiful that I may become a classic sports car fan after all (Just don’t try to make me drive stick shift).

Rumble at Cordington Courtyard

This excellent LEGO courtyard scene by David FNJ reminds me of an ancient Greek temple. Probably due to those amazing round columns and the open air design of the building. All this scene is missing to complete the Grecian theme is a couple of nude sculptures. In addition to those great columns, the roof on this structure is also quite nice. I’m not sure how David constructed it. But maybe you can figure it out by looking at the bird’s-eye view photo for the roof details.

Cordington Courtyard

The Edge: Step into a LEGO painting

It’s not often that I see a LEGO creation and think to myself “this is art.” But Lukasz Wiktorowicz‘s most recent build, “the Edge” certainly is art. Using both classic architecture and surrealist imagery, Lukasz created an absolutely stunning build. The proportions on this thing are spot on and the details are ridiculously, well, detailed. But what really pushes this build over the top is Lukasz’s out-of-the-box building techniques.

The Edge

Normally I’m a stickler for lining up LEGO bricks perfectly (90 or 180 degree angles only, people!). A little crease from a cattywampus brick in an otherwise smooth wall is a downright sin in my book. But Lukasz purposefully stacked the bricks in his four pillars all askew and the resulting texture is fantastic! Another creative feature of this build is the base. When I accumulate a boxful of seemingly useless bricks, I shove them to the back of my shelf and forget about them. Instead of doing the same, Lukasz used those ball socket bricks to create an unconventional base for his build that makes the whole thing look like it is floating. Well done all around.

All who gain power are afraid to lose it. Even the Jedi.

Say what you will about Episodes I through III, but I can appreciate a climactic turning point in a character’s story arc. I can appreciate it, even more, when such a scene is translated into LEGO! Cecilie Fritzvold beautifully captured the final scene of the opening sequence from Revenge of the Sith where Anakin begins his journey to the dark side by killing Count Dooku. The amount of detail jammed into this LEGO scene is fantastic! I love the microscale ships in the background, Palpatine’s clikits handcuffs, and of course, the prone, unconscious body of Obi-Wan in the foreground.

Kill him. Kill him now.

In case you missed it earlier this month, Cecilie also built a micro-podracer from The Phantom Menace. As always, be sure to check out all of Cecilie’s builds on Flickr and may the force be with you.

Curiouser and curiouser!

Since the release of the Collectible Disney Minigures earlier this year, I’ve been waiting to see the adorable Alice figure put to great use. And that’s exactly what The Knit Knight has done here! Knight built the iconic scene where Alice falls down the rabbit hole in her quest to crash the white rabbit’s party. This LEGO scene is truly complete, including excellently-built, falling furniture, striped wallpaper, sweets and fizzy drinks (presumably all labeled “eat me” and “drink me”), a miniature rabbit-sized door, and even a tiny Dinah waving goodbye to Alice from the real world.

brief

A Board Game of High Kings

I’ve never heard of the ancient board game Ard Ri (more commonly known as Tafl or Hnefatafl), but this beautiful LEGO version built by Dan Harris and his girlfriend Dot makes me want to learn how to play. One of the oldest games in the world, Ard Ri (which means “High King” in Gaelic) was a Scottish variant of tafl played on a 9×9 board. Dan built the board structure and the stunning figurines that look like they were hand carved from ivory and wood. Dot built the incredible cheese slope mosaic which serves as the game’s board. I love the ship silhouettes and the intricate scrollwork and dragon head surrounding the king’s seat.

Ard Ri

The rules of the game are pretty straightforward. Using 8 soldiers to protect his king, the defending player must move the King from its starting place at the center of the board to one of the four corners. If the King reaches a corner, he escapes and wins the game. The opposing player, of course, must use his 16 soldiers to stop the King from escaping. All game pieces move horizontally or vertically through any number of unoccupied squares (like a Rook piece in chess) and pieces are captured by “sandwiching” an opposing player’s piece between two of your own. (I like to imagine that each of the victorious soldiers on either side of a captured piece grabs one of the captured soldier’s elbows and politely, but firmly, escorts him off of the board in the fashion of two mall security guards escorting an obnoxious teenager out of a store.) To capture the king, you must surround him on all four sides (two security guards per elbow). The game ends when the King either escapes or his captured.

Ard Ri

Buckle your pants for this LEGO BattleBlock Theater cat guard!

If you’ve played BattleBlock Theater before, then you’ll definitely recognize this adorable cat guard built by Letranger Absurde. If you’ve haven’t played the game before, let me just say it’s pretty much exactly like soccer, except more like basketball, and nothing like soccer. Absurde perfectly captured the soulless gaze and boxy stature of the game’s heartless prison guards. I’d love to have this guy sitting on my desk at work. My productivity would likely triple under this little guy’s iron paw!

BattleBlock Theater Cat Guard

This post was brought to you by yarn. Yarn, it’s a ball!

Watch the Autumn leaves change from Stonecreek Lookout

Sergeant Chipmunk is the master of texture. First, it was insanely beautiful, jagged rockwork. Then, a sleek and stylish castle of ice. Now, it’s a deceptively simple castle with extra-blocky crenellation surrounded by autumn-time trees. The new texture? Well, Chipmunk put a handful of 1×1 round tiles to great use by carefully stacking them into dragonscale-like textured walls for his castle. I can’t imagine the zen-like patience this man must have.

Stonecreek Forest

Carousel! Carousel! CAROUSEL!

Justin Winn‘s spacemen have been tirelessly going about their day-to-day jobs and even studying for advanced space degrees. So it’s good to see these hard-working minifigs take down their hair and have fun from time to time. Justin spacified Set 10196: The Grand Carousel and his new version is awesome. It has a ton of spacey details but my favorite bits are those custom printed space logo sails that form the carousel roof. They’d look pretty sweet on a space ship too, right?

10196 Grand Carousel - Classic Space Redux