Living in a house of bricks

We’ve previously featured Terez trz‘s ongoing project of creating a LEGO version of their own home. Now we have more images to pore over — a wonderful sitting area.

Homesweethome

Whilst the building is cool, once again it’s the quality of Terez’s photography which elevates the models out of the ordinary. The images wouldn’t look out of place in a fancy interiors catalog. Whilst the diorama doesn’t feature any people, I think it avoids sterility with the sense of lived-in clutter created by touches like the pile of mail by the door and the organic messiness of the pot plants.

Homesweethome

When you can’t find the sports car of your dreams, you build it yourself

Malte Dorowski, who is a huge fan of Porsche sports cars, rolls out a magnificent copy of Porsche 911 GT3 RS. Despite being built out of System bricks, it looks much more complicated than its bigger brother from the Technic Technic Porsche 911 set. From the very first sight you know that this little beauty is much more complicated on the inside than on the outside.

LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS (991 2016)

Malte builds his cars with astonishing level of detail, including elaborate inner workings in his models. It’s not only about the interior, but about all the nodes and joints. I had no idea how all these parts could be assembled into one car, but the longer you observe the dismantled vehicle, the better you see some truly mind-blowing solutions Malte used to keep the tiniest of slopes and tiles together.

LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS (991 2016)

Venice, 1486: an Assassin’s Creed II scene in LEGO

Assassin’s Creed II is a video game I consider a must-play, with its incredible interpretation of Renaissance-era Italy, fun and simple stealth gameplay, and Ezio Auditore being my favorite assassin in the series. Builders Jonas Kramm and Brick Vader met up and collaborated on one of the most incredible dioramas in LEGO I have seen — one that undoubtedly does justice to a great game. I spent plenty of time admiring just how much attention to detail these two builders have in their Venice scene, and my favorite details captured have to be the gameplay aspect of Assassin’s Creed brought to life. The facades look climbable, the black pole appears perfectly aligned for a swing into a double assassination on the guards, and of course a cart of hay that make a leap of faith from any height safe.

Venice 1486

Even if one hasn’t played Assassin’s Creed II, one can still appreciate the iconic, beautifully constructed Venetian architecture and canals.

Venice 1486 - Detail

Nothing is true; everything is permitted.

Gorgeous fan-built LEGO Technic Porsche 919, the 2015 Le Mans winner

Manuel Nascimento built this incredible LEGO Technic Porsche 919 after watching the real-life car win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2015. Not content to simply recreate the stunning shape out of LEGO, Manuel also decorated his car like the real one, saying, “I had too much fun decorating the car but at the same time I also had a lot of work because all stickers were hand made.” Check out more of this beautiful racecar below, including the working functions.

LEGO Technic - Porsche 919 - Le Mans 2015 v.

LEGO Technic - Porsche 919 - Le Mans 2015 v.

 

Several of the car’s functions really work, including an opening hood, doors, and engine compartment.

LEGO Technic - Porsche 919 - Le Mans 2015 v.

The lights work too, thanks to LEGO Power Functions.

LEGO Technic - Porsche 919 - Le Mans 2015 v.

And if you want to see the car in full 360°, check out this video. Manuel’s car is also featured in Issue 15 of Bricks Magazine.

Built to protect and serve all through the night

Djordje is known for some really incredible LEGO figures and this night-watch Mech is no disappointment. Named Regulus after one of the brightest lights in the night sky and the brightest star in Leo, this mech stands on his own. The crisp color scheme gives the feel of a professional security detail, while the sturdy construction, over-sized revolver and no-nonsense stance let you know that this bot is up for anything. Cross him at your own risk!

REGULUS 02-GR

Take nothing but minerals, leave nothing but tyre prints

Check out this smart LEGO space rover scene from Sad Brick. The mining vehicle itself is an excellent example of quality microscale building, creating an impression of detail and realistic function with the use of only a handful of parts. But it’s the quality landscaping in tan bricks — tanscaping, if you will — which really impresses me. Don’t miss the tracks left in the dust behind the rover’s wheels — brilliant.

MicroRover

LEGO baby delivered in style

Angela Chung has made great use of the new baby minifig in an excellent hospital scene depicting the arrival of a new baby. Sometimes “obvious parts usage” makes for the best models.

Welcome a new life

The details of the delivery room surrounding the central action are nicely done with a variety of mobile medical machinery at the ready. I particularly like the incubator trolley with it’s little heat lamp waiting to keep the new arrival cosy. However, close attention to the scene does raise one troubling question…what is the screwdriver for? Regardless, this is a lovely model, and is all the more refreshing for depicting the sort of real-life events we don’t often see “in the brick”.

Sleek cruiser hides a dark side

John Moffat‘s latest build is the Marie Curie, the first of Earth’s Manchester class attack cruisers which sailed out of the Lagrange shipyard in 2380. What a sleek beauty she is with her subtle dark red highlights and that smooth aerodynamic upper hull covering the intricate ‘greebled’ inner workings of the ship. The little touches of dark tan and yellow add interest and draw the eye to the darker greebled areas — a great way to ensure that all those subtle details are appreciated.

UNEN Marie Curie

Now, I wonder if John built two Marie Curie attack cruisers or if there’s a clone in our midst?

Angry Birds are instantly recognizable in micro form

In a testament to the insane popularity of Angry Birds and the amazing skill of the builder, this microbuild by Letranger Absurde is instantly recognizable.

Despite the tiny size, the birds and slingshot are brilliant. I count nine pieces, and they perfectly encapsulate the birds. My favourite part usage here is the minifig slingshot which becomes supersized thanks to the scale of the scene. There are many more details, and I highly encourage you to scan the pig castle to see all the other little details for yourself.

Angry Birds

Creepily colorful LEGO skulls

David Hughes is building a series of wonderfully creepy LEGO skulls. They have a definite Mexican Day Of The Dead vibe going on with bold color choices and geometric patterns. Our hobby is generally dominated by minifig-scale models depicting scenes or vehicles — sometimes it makes for a pleasant change when we get these kind of larger-scale art pieces beautifully put together from good old-fashioned bricks.
Day of the Dead Red Skull
Day of the Dead Blue Skull